Toyota will pay more than a billion dollars to SUV owners

Toyota will pay more than a billion dollars to SUV owners 1




Concern Toyota will pay owners of frame SUVs more than a billion dollars. Federal Court of Australia has found the Japanese carmaker guilty of selling diesel cars with defective diesel particulate filters – we are talking about 264 thousand Toyota Hilux, Land Cruiser Prado, and Fortuner with 1GD-FTV and 2GD-FTV turbocharged engines. Judge Lee ordered Toyota to pay owners 17.5 percent of the average retail price of each vehicle.

Authorities found that the defective particulate filters were placed on Toyota SUVs and pickup trucks sold in Australia between October 2015 and April 2020. A total of 264,170 vehicles on the Green Continent were found to have problematic turbo diesel. According to local press estimates, the Japanese auto giant’s payments to affected car owners could reach two billion Australian dollars (about $1.5 billion).

The federal court ruled that because of defective particulate filters, owners of Hilux, Land Cruiser Prado, and Fortuner faced increased fuel consumption, and the operation of the vehicles was accompanied by emissions of stinky white smoke. Some owners of the defective vehicles tried in vain to have the vehicles repaired at dealerships; the SUVs were idle, causing owners to lose income.

The plaintiffs argued that Toyota should pay compensation equal to 25 percent of the vehicle’s value; the court granted the claims in part, ordering the Japanese auto giant to compensate at 17.5 percent of the average retail price. If Toyota does not appeal the verdict, the average payment to each car owner will exceed five thousand dollars. A spokesman for the Japanese concern would not comment to local reporters on the process.

A month ago, Toyota was forced to admit to falsifying data on emissions in Japan. “Toyota’s subsidiary Hino found that commercial diesel did not meet local environmental standards and that simplified exhaust systems were installed on at least 115,000 trucks and buses.

Source: Drive.com.au