Ford will abandon internal combustion engines in Europe by 2035

Ford will abandon internal combustion engines in Europe by 2035 1




Ford’s European division has announced that it will refuse to sell new cars with internal combustion engines (ICE) in Europe by 2035.

Ford will join 27 companies that have backed a call by European countries not to sell new cars with internal combustion engines after 2035. The automaker has also pledged to help meet mandatory targets for charging infrastructure (charging every 60 km in the EU).

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The call aligns with Europe’s previous goal to arrive at net-zero emissions by 2050. However, clear timelines and legislation in the EU still need to be adopted to ensure the transition to electric vehicles.

“At Ford, we believe that freedom of travel goes hand-in-hand with taking care of our planet and each other,” said Stuart Rowley, Ford’s head of Europe. – That’s why we’re aiming for all Ford vehicles to be emission-free by 2035. To achieve that, EU policymakers must also set binding national targets for a seamless electric charging infrastructure that meets the growing demand for electric vehicles.

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Those responsible for the European Commission’s proposal are currently deciding on new clean car regulations. The European Parliament and EU governments will determine their positions in June, and a final law will be passed in the fall.

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Ford is working hard to make the transition to electric cars, with goals set as far back as 2024. The Puma EV and two electric crossovers were announced last March, and five all-electric commercial vehicles are on the horizon. The Mustang Mach-E is already selling well in the Old Continent.

Meanwhile, Germany has so far rejected a proposal for a total ban on internal combustion engines after 2035, as the country’s Ministry of Transportation sees some potential in renewable fuels. Italy, on the other hand, is demanding some leniency for supercar manufacturers against the backdrop of the ban on combustion engines, citing the difference in production volume.

Source: Motor1