Australian scientists have come up with a way to give a second life to diesel engines

Australian scientists have come up with a way to give a second life to diesel engines 1

A group of employees of the UNSW Engine Research Laboratory has introduced a new dual fuel system with direct injection of hydrogen and diesel fuel, which significantly reduces carbon emissions.

Researchers from the University of New South Wales in Sydney have developed a way to extend the life of diesel engines, which will be banned for new cars in Europe from 2035.

This is a dual-fuel system with direct injection of hydrogen and diesel fuel, developed by the UNSW Engine Research Laboratory team.

“Engineers have successfully converted a diesel engine into a hybrid hydrogen-diesel engine while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by more than 85%,” the statement said.

The team started work 18 months ago, making existing diesel engines of all types and applications capable of running on 90% hydrogen fuel in just a couple of months of operation.

An article published in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy shows that the use of a patented hydrogen injection system reduces CO2 emissions to just 90 g/kWh, which is 85.9% lower than the amount produced by a diesel engine. The new technology significantly reduces CO2 emissions from existing diesel engines, so it can play an important role in reducing the carbon footprint. Especially in Australia with all mining, agricultural, and other heavy industries where diesel engines are widely used.

Green hydrogen, which is produced using clean renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, is much more environmentally friendly than diesel. To get a dual diesel-hydrogen engine, the UNSW team retained the original diesel fuel injection in the engine, but added hydrogen fuel injection directly into the cylinder.

The study showed that synchronized direct injection of hydrogen specifically controls the state of the mixture inside the engine cylinder, eliminating harmful emissions of nitrogen oxides, which were the main obstacle to the commercialization of hydrogen engines.